The gentlemen’s manor

Mid-19th century

The gentlemen’s manor consists of the billiard room and the tower room as they could have appeared in the mid-19th century. It was here the gentlemen could retire after dinner and play games, smoke and discuss.

The estate owners of the mid-19th century were not only sorely tried farmers, but also fathers and husbands, public servants loyal to king and country and, towards the end of the period, also politicians in the new democratic system. All of this is reflected in the decoration and furnishings here. The colours are bold, heavy and masculine and the furniture is solid and sturdy. On the walls hang royal portraits, and the billiard room is dominated by the large billiard table with low-hung lamps that cast light over its green surface. Along the walls stand sofas and armchairs, from where the game can be observed in comfort.

The golden age’s fusion of international inspiration and inwardly-looking nationalism is reflected in the decorations of these gentlemen’s rooms. The furniture represents renowned Danish furniture design of the period, while the red and gold wall decoration in the tower room is reminiscent of the mysteries of the Orient.